Monthly Archives: January 2013

Jan 31 Robert Creeley: Oh No

Today’s poem is about that oft misunderstood word irony: saying one thing meaning the opposite. The textbook refers to irony as “a manner of speaking that implies a discrepancy.” And ironic point of view as “the mask [that the poet … Continue reading

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Jan 30 Frederick Seidel: The Cosmos Poems

Today’s poem is inspired by my reading from Richard Dawkins’ “The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing” an anthology of science writing as collected from the textbooks and books written by scientists. It’s a nice sampling of the scientist’s point … Continue reading

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Jan 29 Philip Larkin: Wedding-Wind

Wedding-Wind The wind blew all my wedding-day, And my wedding-night was the night of the high wind; And a stable door was banging, again and again, That he must go and shut it, leaving me Stupid in candlelight, hearing rain, … Continue reading

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Jan 28 Wordsworth: I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud

I admit that I’ve already studied this poem, but it’s always good to re-visit old classics and rediscover what new things there are in it. I also wanted to add a little commentary of my own, because I’ve always had … Continue reading

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Jan 24 Trumbull Stickney: Sir, Say No More

The Introduction to Poetry talks about who is the voice of the poem. Sometimes it’s a child, sometimes it’s a pebble or a cat or a cloud. Often it is an omniscient narrator describing a scene (as in the Robert … Continue reading

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Jan 23 Emily Dickinson: I Like to See It Lap the Miles

This is a poem also about a train, but by the reticent poet and has a slightly different tone to it. I Like To See It Lap The Miles by Emily Dickinson I like to see it lap the Miles … Continue reading

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Jan 22 Walt Whitman: To A Locomotive in Winter

To A Locomotive In Winter by Walt Whitman Thee for my recitative, Thee in the driving storm even as now, the snow, the winter-day declining, Thee in they panoply, thy measur’d dual throbbing and thy beat convulsive, Thy black cylindric … Continue reading

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