Monthly Archives: October 2013

October 31 William Blake: The Tyger

Today is Halloween. My favorite holiday for many reasons. Today I’m talking about interpretation of myth into your own particular mythology and Halloween is that. It used to be called Samhain (pronounced Sa-ween) in the ancient Celtic world. It was … Continue reading

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October 30 W.H. Auden: Musee Des Beaux Arts

In this poem, art reflects art, but more interestingly, it also reflects myth. In this discussion of “myth” in poetry, I wanted to talk about how myth is so prevalent in culture that sometimes the subject isn’t even the myth … Continue reading

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October 29 H.D.: Helen

I’m continuing this week’s discussion of “myth” and the poet’s use of it. Myth, unlike symbol, is a shared cultural story. Symbol, when it is a conventional symbol, carries with it shared cultural meaning; it is a thing that stands … Continue reading

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October 28 Mark Alexander Boyd: Cupid and Venus

I’m still on the subject of “myth” and how poets use it to point their point across. Some use myth as a fitting analogy for their subject. How like Icarus did Bernie Madoff reach high up for the sun and … Continue reading

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October 21 Harvey Shapiro: National Cold Storage Company

This strangely titled poem was written in 1966. I’ve read it five times and still can’t make heads or tails of it, but the 1960s was a strange time for poetry, forms that people had a difficult time with (found … Continue reading

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October 18 William Shakespeare: Full Fathom Five Thy Father Lies

I read this poem and knew that I wanted to post it. I loved it’s sadness and it’s small celebration. My father is dead, it says, lost at sea, that too is grief-worthy news, but he is one with the … Continue reading

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October 16 Wallace Stevens: Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird

I learned about the sixteen part sonnet in school. It was a form that a poet made up, an out of control sonnet with sixteen parts all written in blank verse, all somehow related to each other. It was a … Continue reading

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